Angels and Dreamons

A Dream

I was standing outside on my balcony at night. As I looked out I found there was another apartment building across the road. The other building had a single balcony protruding from its shadowed bulk. I looked closer at the balcony. An ominous black mist emanated from the balcony . As I zoned in to the scene I felt my eyes lose focus.

An angelic figure appeared above me, glowing in white light. I pointed in the direction of the balcony across the way, hoping to bring his attention to the evil aura. I felt him fly away, but from my balcony could only see a glowing white light sinking into indistinct blackness. The white light came back soon after, but still my eyes were unfocused.

Thoughts

Dreams are a place of contrast. With a bit of thought archetypal themes can sometimes be found in dreams. These themes often revolve around simple things like what is large vs. small, what is bright vs. dim or even what is good vs. evil.

We can find these themes by focusing on what seemed important through a dream. Try asking yourself: What colors did you see? What textures did you feel? What sounds did you hear?

Oftentimes it’s not about what you actually saw or heard, but what you felt you saw or heard. If you asked me to describe the “angelic figure” of my dream I would be able to tell you that it was a figure in a bright white light. But I know it was angelic, not because I actually saw the perfect projection of an angel, but because I felt that I was looking at something that would be considered angelic.

I apologize if that seems redundant or arbitrary but I want to make a simple point. Don’t expect too much out of your dreams. You’re going to wake up with vague notions of the relationships that existed in your dreams, so take them at face value. Write what you know and interpret it later.

All that we see or seem

Is but a dream within a dream.

~Edgar Allan Poe

 

Dream on little dreamers,

EB

 

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A major appeal of lucid dreaming is the fact that you can be whoever you want to be. Many meditative practices revolve around the recognition of a distinction between the mind and the body. It can be very healthy to give yourself the perspective of a new shell, even if it’s only subjectively.

What’s great about dreams is that your avatar, the physical representation of yourself in your dreams, is only limited by your imagination. Manipulating the dimensions of your avatar is the usual way people experience this, whether they become as tall as a building or thin as a crack in a door. However, more abstract things are entirely possible through dreams such as taking the form of an animal or the wind.

In a dream that I had just last night I took the part of a strain of seaweed being pulled along by the crashing waves of a beach. With some effort I was able to direct the aim of my drifting in order to sting the main antagonist of the dream with the jellyfish eggs tangled within me.  Admittedly this was an extremely strange dream for me, but at the same time I was glad that I had trained myself to recognize this dream’s insight.

The forms you take can be extremely interesting to observe. Unfortunately, it can be difficult to recognize that you’re an active participant in your dreams and it can also be difficult to know what you look like. Thus, the two goals to avatar recognition are knowing that you are and knowing what you are.

Knowing that you are is the basis of all lucid dreaming and comes with practice but there are some checks you can do to make it easier. Looking at text such as watches, books or phones which tend to look garbled in dreams is usually a good way to assert consciousness. Another method is to focus your energy on any specific object or person in the dream. The “anchor” typically works well for this. Focusing on something allows you to control the flow of the dream and prove your presence to yourself. There are many more methods, but these are a couple that came to mind.

Knowing what you are is where the fun part comes in. Try to take note of the perspective from which you’re viewing the dream. Are you way down at the feet of the people around you? Are you looking them right in the eyes? Or are you soaring far above them like a bird?  Mirrors are usually a lucky find in dreams as they force your mind to either create a picture of your avatar or leave it blank and give you a blatant clue to the fact that you’re dreaming. If you’re able to catch a hint of what you are try to act the part. Ebb and flow like a wave, stretch your wings like a bird or simply just breathe.

Oftentimes it’s only in retrospect that you can recognize what your role was within the dream you just had. Even if you find that you were just yourself most of the time it’s a huge step forward to know even that. Keep on trying and see what you’ll become.

 

Dream on little dreamers,

EB

 

Waking up slow

As someone who has four separate alarms, I understand that waking up is a difficult process. Trying to remember a dream is hard in the wee hours of morning when all you want to do is…well…keep dreaming. There is no one way to make this an easier process other than practice, but what you practice is up to personal preference.

One idea is to wake yourself up about an hour a half (approximately one REM cycle) before your planned waking time. This way when you wake up the second time not only are you quicker to wake but you also give yourself less information to recall. Personally, I find this approach great for starting to learn how to write your dreams but not really too effective for the long term.

Another idea is to set a relaxed routine about your dream recording. Trying to write while still in bed can cause you to zone out or fall back asleep. Try picking a comfortable but upright chair to write your dreams. Maybe that will help you retain just enough cognizance to organize your thoughts.

Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way outlines a method of note recording after you wake known as “the morning pages.” I find that this is very useful to use in combination with dream recording as a kick-start to your writing. You basically write whatever comes to mind for three pages straight, even if it’s complete babble. You can even do it with your eyes closed. See if following this up with journal writing jogs your memory 😀

Keep in mind that looking at distracting electronics (I’m looking at you facebook addicts) immediately after waking up is typically a good way to forget everything about your dreamland adventures. I know that from experience.

 

Dream on little dreamers,

EB